MEMBER LOGIN

DON'T HAVE AN ACCOUNT?

Register & Login HERE

Here at AUTHORSdB we've formed the only database of authors, including social media, book listings and much more, for today's mine-field of thousands of aspiring and established writers.

We are a dedicated website that helps authors for free.

Author Blogs

Syndicated blogs on AUTHORSdb

The Boy Who Wasn’t Me And Other Scary Stories


Voices from beyond. Imaginary friends. Unsettling sights. All this and more … The Boy Who Wasn’t Me I met a boy in the park. He said he was me. He had my clothes on. His hair was like my hair. He knew all the things about dinosaurs that I knew. The boy said that it was my turn to sleep in the park tonight. It was only fair. He said he had been here too long. I turned around. My mum was reading her book. ‘Don’t bother asking her,’ said the boy who wasn’t me. ‘She’ll only agree with me.’ ‘But that’s not fair,’ I said. ‘She’s my mum, not yours. Why would she let you go home with her and leave me here? Why would she do that?’ The boy who wasn’t me smiled. He thought this was very funny. ‘How wou...
Continue reading
0
  63 Hits

Writing Tips from Mark Twain.


 The advice that Mark Twain gave in a letter to D. W. Bowser in 1880 is famous and often quoted even these days. Here it is in full: Writer Samuel Clemens (aka Mark Twain) circa 1907 “I notice that you useplain, simple language, short words and brief sentences. That is the way towrite English – it is the modern way and the best way. Stick to it; don’t letfluff and flowers and verbosity creep in. When you catch an adjective, kill it.No, I don’t mean utterly, but kill most of them – then the rest will bevaluable. They weaken when they are close together. They give strength whenthey are wide apart. An adjective habit, or a wordy, diffuse, flowery habit,once fastened upon a person, is as hard to...
Continue reading
0
  48 Hits

Bellwether – A Sign 0f Things to come?


There has been a dispute in my daily paper about the use of the word bellwether. A reader complained that the word was regularly being used as a synonym for barometer, an indicator of change so to speak. For example, the way a particular town votes in a bye-election is seen as an indication – a bellwether – of how the whole country would vote in a general election. But this was not what he understood the word to mean. The original meaning of bellwether was a lead sheep, usually a castrated ram with a bell round its neck, that other sheep would follow, making the shepherd’s life a bit easier. The word comes from middle English belle (bell) and wether (castrated ram). Even by the thirteenth ce...
Continue reading
0
  46 Hits

Phone Girl And Other Scary Stories

LittleBernieTiger
  Phone Girl And Other Scary Stories Voices from beyond. Imaginary friends. Unsettling sights. All this and more … Phone Girl My mum’s phone rang in the middle of the night. It woke us both up. ‘Go back to sleep, darling,’ she said. The phone rang again. And again. And again. My mum turned it off. It kept ringing. She put it in the fridge. Still it kept ringing. ‘Who is it, Mum?’ I said. Mum didn’t know. ‘There’s no name and no number.’ We didn’t go back to sleep. We both sat in the kitchen. The phone was in the fridge. It kept ringing. I started to think about it. ‘Maybe you should answer it, Mum. It might be important.’ Mum nodded. She opened the fridge. She took out the phone. ‘Hello. Who...
Continue reading
0
  67 Hits

Reading Yourself to Good Health


It is now generally agreed that doctors prescribe too many drugs. They genuinely want to help their patients, but don’t have much time to listen. So a quickly written prescription, and another, and another … leaves both patient and doctor feeling ‘job done’ – if only briefly. But other interventions are felt to be as good as, or better than, pills: cognitive behaviour, trips to the gym, walking (or just stroking) a dog, deep breathing, massages, and many others. The only problem is they take more time to sort, and require more motivation from the patient. There are also people who advocate reading as a cure for many ills, including depression. Take Laura Freeman, for example, the author of T...
Continue reading
0
  71 Hits

No Such Thing as an Irish Leprechaun?!


Leprechauns are quintessentially Irish. Those impish little fellows, clad in green, creating mischief and hiding pots of gold at the end of rainbows pop up throughout Irish folklore. There is even a derivation of the word in the dictionary of medieval Irish that was first compiled in 1913. The word was originally spelt lupracan, which itself was derived from the old Irish for small – lu, and body – corp. This all seemed to make perfect sense. Unfortunately for Irish sensitivities, recent research by linguists from Cambridge and Queens (Belfast) universities, have found a different derivation. Worse, the leprechaun isn’t even Irish in origin! Luprecan, they have discovered, comes from the Lat...
Continue reading
0
  70 Hits

The Sounding Rocks And Other Stories


Hi Everybody Ahead of publishing a new anthology of children’s horror short stories, I’m road testing some of them. Here’s the eponymous story which opens the anthology. Let me know what you think. Thanks The Sounding Rocks Jake didn’t like the Sounding Rocks. He said they sounded like crumbling pain. Like when you have toothache and you can hear it as well as feel it. Like that. Like sharp jagged bits of stone all jabbing in your mind at once and all together. He called them the Sounding Rocks. ‘I don’t like the Sounding Rocks. They put bad feelings in my ears at night.’ Jake’s mum smiled. What else could she do? It was all a mum or dad could do most of the time. Jake kept talking. ‘They so...
Continue reading
0
  84 Hits

Not a Political Comment


This blog is not the place for political comment. However extraordinary the events unfolding, I have been determined to resist the temptation to make any comment. To do so, it is said, risks losing friends Left, Right and Centre. However, as one of Oscar Wilde’s characters said ‘I can resist anything but temptation,’ So, just this once, here goes. Twas brillig and the slithy toves did gyre and gamble in the wabe. All mimsy were the borogoves and the mome raths outgrabe. Beware the Jabberwock, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun the frumious Bandersnatch. He took his vorpal sword in hand. Longtime the manxome foe he sought. So rested he by the Tu...
Continue reading
0
  69 Hits

Ending Book Poverty


Many people reading this blog are writers. All who read it are (obviously) readers. Books are an integral part of our lives, and a house without them is unthinkable. But this is not the case universally, even in Britain. Every week, The Big Issue magazine in the UK has a feature with the generic heading changemakers. This week the article was about Dee-Dee Crosher, under the title Unpacking the Answer to Book Poverty. Dee-Dee was a child actor, then talent agent, who decided a couple to years ago to take a break from agency work whilst she thought about a change in direction. Still under thirty, she had always loved reading and whilst thinking about what to do next she set about finding and ...
Continue reading
0
  132 Hits

Shawn Bracebridge – The Cat’s Pyjamas and Other Stories

IMG_5661
I recently had the pleasure of chatting to Dublin-based artist and illustrator, Shawn Bracebridge. With his distinctive style and eye for the quirky, Shawn’s artwork combines beautiful echoes of previous decades of graphic design with a vibrant, contemporary edge.  1. How did you get started? For as long as I can remember I have always been drawing. My father is a very talented painter, which is where I initially found inspiration. I have always had a very active imagination which always adds to my creativity. When I finished school I knew that I wanted to pursue a career in art. I initially wanted to study animation, while I do have a strong interest and love for animation I quickly discove...
Continue reading
0
  74 Hits

A YA book for the end of the holidays?


And Alex Still Has Acne is my novel for Young Adults that has been an Amazon best-seller, and was re-published by Solstice Publishing in 2018. It’s a short, chirpy, read with a feel good ending, but a few dark episodes along the way: acne, adoption, alcohol, and anorexia, to mention just the things beginning with ‘a’. Plenty going on as well as the usual problems of growing up, and dealing with with schools and parents who just don’t understand. Ideal, you may think, as a quick read before going back to school! What is the novel about? Here’s what it says on the back cover. Life for fourteen year old Alex is OK most of the time. He enjoys school, has a best friend Sam, and a pretty and only ...
Continue reading
0
  80 Hits

Terminal Transit – Irish, Apocalyptic, Science Fiction, Horror Novel


Synopsis A brilliant research student discovers a plot fulminated by demons from another dimension and kills himself in the process. The fate of the world is left in the hands of an elderly academic and a mysterious orphan. Using the facts surrounding Ireland’s economic collapse in 2008 as its starting point, Terminal Transit is an apocalyptic adventure dealing with death and destruction in a Dublin slowly devastated by demonic intervention. Can the end of the world be avoided? Or is this planet simply scheduled for Terminal Transit? Terminal Transit, Chapter II ‘A New Signal’ Verse 2 The audience never came home from the homecoming concert. Not one single member. For a country well versed i...
Continue reading
0
  0 Hits

What is an ‘Easy Rider’?


Peter Fonda died last week so, not unnaturally, most newspapers carried articles about him and his most iconic film Easy Rider. Both he and his co-star explained that they chose the title because ‘an easy rider is a person that is not a pimp, but lives off a woman,’ (Hopper). Fonda went further, saying it was a comment on the state of America at the end of the 1960s. The film was hugely popular, but not with the Hollywood moguls, and Fonda struggled to find films and roles that would bring him equal fame. But were they right about the meaning of easy rider? Originally the term meant an expert horse rider, or horse that was easy to ride. (Transfer this to a motorbike and the film title seems ...
Continue reading
0
  98 Hits

CAST OFF – Stories for the beach?


CAST OFF is my collection of short stories based on female characters in plays by Shakespeare. It was published by Solstice in 2017. In each of the thirteen stories I take one of his characters and imagine what she might be thinking and doing when not on stage. So we have Kate, from the Taming of the Shrew, thumping her creator for writing such horrid role for her; Nerissa, from The Merchant of Venice, delighting in dressing up in men’s clothes and cavorting round town with her mistress, Portia; Cassandra, from Troilus and Cressida, revelling in poor personal hygiene and loud wails; Hermia, in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, getting blind drunk and passing out under a tree in a pub beer garden; H...
Continue reading
0
  94 Hits

Terminal Transit – Irish, Apocalyptic, Science Fiction, Horror Novel


Synopsis A brilliant research student discovers a plot fulminated by demons from another dimension and kills himself in the process. The fate of the world is left in the hands of an elderly academic and a mysterious orphan. Using the facts surrounding Ireland’s economic collapse in 2008 as its starting point, Terminal Transit is an apocalyptic adventure dealing with death and destruction in a Dublin slowly devastated by demonic intervention. Can the end of the world be avoided? Or is this planet simply scheduled for Terminal Transit? Terminal Transit, Chapter II ‘A New Signal’ Verse 1 Priory Hall. Two words that stand as a simple testament to an ignorant nation’s stupid, craven greed – that ...
Continue reading
0
  0 Hits

Pet names and Hypocorisms


You might not have heard the term hypocorism before, but I suspect you’ve committed a few when writing. And quite a few more when speaking. The word is Greek in origin, but the practice goes back thousands of years and can be found in all the Indo – European languages. The hypocoristic principle is basically to take a single syllable word, double the consonants and add an open vowel. You can see this at work in family and pet names: Grandmother – Gran – Granny Mother – Mum/Mom – Mummy /Mommy Father – Dad – Daddy. Sarah – Sal – Sally Thomas – Tom – Tommy Ann – Nan – Nanny. This last one is interesting as in the nineteenth century Ann was used as a pet name for a female goat, now known as a na...
Continue reading
0
  108 Hits

Memoir or Autobiography?


“The past is a foreign country.” So said L P Hartley, the author of The Go Between. When it comes to people’s recollections however, it may be more true to say that the past is several foreign countries, because what we each remember with absolute certainty is quite often different from how others who were there remember it. To check this out, ask your siblings or parents about a family event from your childhood, and see if they remember the details in the same way you have. To get an accurate picture of events from the past, historians like to listen to the accounts of people who were there. But then they have to check these against the records. And bear in mind that documents from the time...
Continue reading
0
  105 Hits

My Books Featured at Christian Book Readers

Faith and Love was my first entry because the title sounded very Christian. The site also features the video I created for the series and asks me questions about my inspiration for the stories. https://christianbookreaders.com/faith-and-love-by-cecelia-hopkins/#more-317677 Original link
0
  17 Hits

Terminal Transit – Irish, Apocalyptic, Science Fiction, Horror Novel


Synopsis A brilliant research student discovers a plot fulminated by demons from another dimension and kills himself in the process. The fate of the world is left in the hands of an elderly academic and a mysterious orphan. Using the facts surrounding Ireland’s economic collapse in 2008 as its starting point, Terminal Transit is an apocalyptic adventure dealing with death and destruction in a Dublin slowly devastated by demonic intervention. Can the end of the world be avoided? Or is this planet simply scheduled for Terminal Transit? Terminal Transit, Chapter I ‘The Song of the NotBeSpeak,’ Verse 12 With the terrible truth now trickling from beyond, it is fair to say that the world has reach...
Continue reading
0
  0 Hits

The French are in the mood for love!


Every so often, the French throw a wobbly about the numberof English words creeping into their language. I remember as a school girl beingtold about the dangers of Franglais andthat, while the French might say le weekend,we should talk about the fin de la semaine in our oral exam, if the conversationturned on what we might be doing at the weekend. Then there was the joke (orperhaps it wasn’t) that the French, having cottoned onto the English liking fortea and cake at 5pm, and themselves enjoying a mid-afternoon snack before themore substantial main meal in the evening, had brought the whole thing forwardan hour, so that A quatre heures, nousfive o’clockerons. (At four o’clock, we have a ligh...
Continue reading
0
  91 Hits